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the endangered species t, it is not obeying the environment of national policy act. john: i assumed these people mean well, they are not evil. >> they mean well, but their priorities are all about the species and nothing about the individual landowners who are simply trying to earn a living on their land. this is an agency that has forgotten who they serve. they should be serving the people that live on the land as well. people and the animals can coexist and they can cooperate to do this, but when you have the heavy hand of the federal government threatening people of jail time and huge fines, if you don't do this, you will have all sorts of trouble. it creates disincentives because landowners do not want to help endangered species act if that is essentially going to be an economic death sentence for them. john: hence the phrase shoot, shovel, and shut up. >> that is the trifecta that happens on some land. some people do it legally, cutting down trees before they get old enough to be habitat for the woodpeckers. it is not good for the woodpecker, not good for the land, it is not good for the ec
past that meander up and down the park under pines and eucalyptus. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prep
the endangered species act, it is not obeying the environment of national policycy act. john: i assumed theseeople mean well, they are not evil. >> they mean well, but their priorities are all about the species and nothing about the individual landowners who are simply trying to earn a living on their land. this is an agency that has forgotten who they serve. they should be serving the people that live on the land as well. people and the animals can coexist and they can cooperate to do this, but when you have the heavy hand of the federal governme threatening people of jail time and hugeines, if you don't do this, you will have all sorts of trouble. it creates disincentives because landowners do not want to help endangered species act if that is essential going to be an economic death sentence for them. john: hence the phrase shoot, shovel, and shut up. >> that is the trifecta that happens on some land. some people do it legally, cuing down trees before they get old engh to be habitat for the woodpeckers. it is not goodor the woodpecker, not good for the land, it is not good for the eco
environment that will make people want to work here. >> reporter: despite the competition, many of the visitors from japan became interested in coming to brazil. >> translator: the more i learn, the harder it seems to do business here. but i think brazil has huge potential as a market. >> reporter: the competition for labor is starting to spread into more and more rural areas in brazil. but that's unlikely to discourage japanese companies from investing in this rapidly expanding economy. nhk world. >>> let's now get another check of the market figures. >>> crews at the damaged fukushima daiichi nuclear plant in japan have started work on a project to stop highly contaminated water from escaping into the environment. tokyo electric power company workers discovered three of seven underground storage pools are leaking. tepco officials believe pools one and two may be leaking the most. so they're placing priority on draining them. on tuesday, workers started transferring about 20 tons of water per hour from pool two to an above ground tank more than 400 meters away. officials say th
is at work. everybody is on this. in that kind of an environment with a large city like this, large police department, obviously the first responders on the scene are race volunteers, runners themselves, passersby. and emts. how does it work practically to have the foeb in charge? the n fbi is coordinating it. what does that mean when they're dealing with a large sort of resources. >> first of all, new in being a real attack is not new to the city of boston, the state of massachusetts and the federal authorities up there. back in 2011, just over two years ago, and previously before that the federal government in conjunction with boston did exercises exactly to prepare for situations like this. so what you have is the immediate response is always going to be governed by the boston police department and fire department. and then over team there will be a transition to the fbi. but most importantly, this has to be done hand in hand. the state, local and federal cooperation, this isn't honestly like the movies, where the fbi shows up and says we're in charge now. the relationship between the f
of the environment. >> trauma surgeon explaining that there have been doctors in surgery since early this morning. he's been in surgery since 8:00 this morning. he's performed several surgeries on the injured victims of today's bombings. the bombings took place at approximately 2:50 p.m. local time. the trauma surgeon reporting one of his medical partners here at massachusetts general has military experience and has served in both iraq and afghanistan. the doctor describing that experience, that wartime experience as being apparently very useful today. as doctors treated some of the more than 130 people who were injured. there are many, many unanswered questions tonight. including unconfirmed reports about other potentially explosive devices. found on or near the scene of the bombings today. law enforcement officials have not confirmed that there were other unexploded bombs for lack of a less specific but more politic term. as of tonight the official confirmation is that there were two devices. only two. those were the two that caused the massive explosions. to the extent that there were other device
is above sea level rise and certainly when we talk about the environment. as the title of this panel says, along green view. it is absolutely about how the complexities of human decision making, human settlement, individual ambition, always contradictory emotions of people have shape not only what the environment is, we impact it and give them access. but how we think of it to my we formulate the idea of the wild and now often that is based on these often very self-serving tropes that we invented. so the environment is about history, human action. and in this but what i tried to do is to show how some of those crosscurrents work. he said sell thing boils down to the final decisive battle but against the indians to have been an extremely aggressive northern plains tribe who had been the ones first to master horses and had arranged absolutely right through the yellowstone country hunting in the fire all, for example. once there were dealt with the exploration could continue, but one last cautionary note goes back to the question of prison. i think it is very easy when people look at this bo
different country, we are living in a very different environment where it is no longer patriotism and love and family, it is not terrorists and hate. we have toounderstand that. we have to say we are in fact committed to our liberties and freedom, but you know, the people also deserve to be safe in their neighborhoods and homes. melissa: you think we have to figure out what to do from here, how to live differently, what should have been the indifferently for something like this not happen? >> we have many students in boston. they get here on a student visa from countries all across the world and we are happy about that but once they get here they don't return. many of them don't return and they stay here for 6 years, they marry and become permanent citizens and we don't know if these two young men from chechnya, i know what that places like. i have seen violence in belfast and all these places where i have been, as a diplomat and an ambassador. the other thing is i always -- at the marathon and walking up the street and saw hundreds and hundreds of young people walking around with backpack
to provide a very secure environment. you literally can't do it. if your standard is nobody can be at risk at a large public event, we're never going to have another u 2 concert. there are basic procedures for events like this. they're well established. we've learned from everything from the '96 olympic bombings to what you should do. are this they going to do a review? did we do the due diligence? they'll have to. it will be pretty clear whether that was done or not. and then we'll move on from there and we may learn some things to improve. we've got a pittsburgh marathon coming up, other things. you can't stop these public events. you can't make them perfectly secure, but you can do due diligence. the key point is the best way to stop these attacks is good intelligence, good police enforcement that goes out and finds the perpetrators before they do something. >> you can't protect every inch of a 26.2 mile race of course, that's for sure. james carafano, security expert in washington. thank you so much for being with us. really appreciate it. >> thanks for having me. >> reporter: thanks s
they are able to say if they were small bits of metal place there had intentionally or part of the environment. >> forensic pathologist fox news contributor dr. michael baden live this morning. what do you think? >> i think a lot of information being retrieved not only from the streets, but also from the bodies, the surgeons working on people are removing shrapnel, some of which comes from the bomb. the medical examiner's office this morning will do the autopsies on the three people that died. the first thing they will do identify the bodies but take x-rays of the bodies so they can remove any shrapnel that can be part of the bomb. but they also have two in tact bombs. >> we think. we don't really know that. >> allegedly. if indeed they do -- >> if the early reports are true. >> -- and any bomb that didn't explode there's a probe of information they can check back who made the wires. >> who bought the bags. >> what about in terms of shrapnel for lack of a better word in bodies how can that lead to anything? >> that is part of the bomb. it can telling y you where this of object was purchased, w
. they are mostly used in environments for the environment, whether it be the sand in the desert or the jungle, it would interfere with the explosive. that has been traditionally their use. that being said, these things are easy to find, easy to make. i don't have to tell you, you can look up on the internet and see the step by step instructions out to do that. and matter of assembling the various ingredients you would do to put it together. that to expand on what he was saying, they are getting a lot of evidence how the bomb was made but they don't have a lot of evidence about who did this or why. the actual evidence that would lead to the person or persons involved. >> this suggests a slightly higher level of them what was first thought yesterday and if so, does that narrow down the net of potential suspects? >> it does. the black powder, the acetone, peroxide, you don't want to let it get went. absolutely right. you want to protect the explosives, the detonator. when this bomb went off, talked to a couple of people and their first reaction was what is happening to people coming back from af
environment environment. i like the you have to pick your spots and be very aware what is going on around you. melissa: panel, thanks for your insight. we really appreciate it. >> thank you. melissa: coming up on "money" with have exclusive interview with the co-owner of the boston celtics what he is doing to make fans are safe at the game. this will change his way of doing business. oil falls to the lowest level in a month. we'll tell you why. plus what effect will the boston bombing have on the price of crude. stay right here. a lot more "money" straight ahead. melissa: so we have some breaking news to report. nfl broadcaster and icon pat summer all passed away at the age of 82. let's go to dennis kneale with more on this. >> hello, melissa, the beloved broadcaster, pat summerall died at age 82 in dallas. open employed a succinct staccato style and brief to the point. was 82 years old. he work ad record 16 super bowls on network television. was at cbs from 61 to 1993. then went from cbs to fox in 1994. he retired after the 2002 season but remain ad beloved figure in american broadcasting, e
on in the macro environment environment. i like the you have to pick your spots and be very aware what is going on around you. melissa: panel, thanks for your insight. we really appreciate it. >> thank you. melissa: coming up on "money" with have exclusive interview with the co-owner of the boston celtics what he is doing to make fans are safe at the game. this will change his way of doing business. oil falls to the lowest level in a month. we'll tell you why. plus what effect will the boston bombing have on the price of crude. stay right here. a lot more "money" straight ahead. we went out and asked people a simple question: how old ithe oldest person you've known? we gave people a sticker and had them show us. we learned a lot of us have known someone who's lived well into their 90s. and that's a great thing. but even though we're living longer, one thing that hasn changed: the official retirement age. ♪ the question is how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all of these years. ♪ at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in with premium service like
our green is universal with green beer. we mean beer production that goes easy on the environment. it's an interesting story and iex breaking right here squawk this morning. miller coor's is reporting that its famous golden colorado brewery, the largest single site brewery on the planet is now weeks away from becoming a zero waste site. what does that moon exactly? more than 99% of brewery waste, glass, plastic, even spent grain gets reused or recycled. interesting story behind this initiative, the idea came from a long time employee, a shop floor technician there with the initial plan to get the company's major breweries to zero waste. for much more on earth week and this story and others, check out green.cnbc.com. kind of an interesting feel good -- and it has to do with beer and drinking. >> i didn't know this. jane wells and tom rotuna on the on assignment desk are doing this whole thing called brew and chew. >> i read about this, too. it's going the be online. >> on cnbc.com. it's all about beer news, food news. jane wells, i saw her in california two weeks ago. she said she prom
's not really an environment that we operate in that... that you can't bring a dog. logane's su a demand for themt itland says they'd be used on almost every mission if there were enough of them. and it's not just about their nose. ritland is training this dog rico to track humans and take down enemy fighters. he's three and a half years old, and ritland has been working with him for the past year. here, he's about to apprehend a suspect. these dogs can run faster than 30 miles an hour. the suspect is one of mike ritland's partners, and he's screaming to make this as realistic as possible. these dogs are trained to capture, not to kill. >> ritland: there's no human being on earth that can outrun them. you know, i can tell you that the physical capability of these dogs is impossible to explain hard evento comprehend when you see it. >> logan: how hard can they bite? >> ritland: hard enough to break bones. i had a dog bite me right here, like this. he only had his mouth on me for probably four or five seconds and broke my wrist. >> logan: he broke your wrist in four or five seconds? >> rit
something. about being aware of your environment. if it looks unusual. tell something abit. a -- about it. >> best advice. don't let them affect your life. go back and live your life. >> live your life. when you compromise how you live that gives them a victory. as painful as it is to day. you can't let them succeed by us changing the norm and how we live. can't let them win. no victories. >> i think the last point is so important. you can't let them win. can't say i will not go to the ball game because of what if? that's what they want. >> that's what they want. they want you to stay home and watch this coverage and be too scared to do anything. you have to go out and live your life. important clues, for as chaotic as that look. there are important clues of behind the -- >> the injured. if anybody has hand injuries. some one could be using bomb make mag terl and residue on their hants. >> this shrapnel and things that could have come from the device itself. >> that's right. and pierre thomas is reporting what they want to see is how was it detonated, remotely detona detonated, with a cel
to stormwater infrastructure to transport water away from the urban environment. one approach was to carry waste and stormwater through the same pipe. this combined system was less expensive than building two individual pipe networks. and stormwater was seen as a way to flush out the sewers. through the 19th century, the combined system was considered state-of-the-art throughout the world, and is still in use in many cities today. but cities constructed these systems before treatment was the standard. and even today's largest treatment plant doesn't have the capacity to treat the sudden volumes of water rushing through a combined system during rain. the plant is overloaded, and the excess rainwater, mixed with untreated raw sewage, is diverted straight into local waterways, creating a combined sewer overflow, or cso. there are over 700 communities in the united states with combined sewer systems. the other approach was to separate wastewater from stormwater, using two pipe networks. this separate system simply carries the stormwater away from the city. but even separate systems pollute the water
to reduce the infrastructure's impact upon the environment. on the front lines of protecting the beaches, are the crews that clean out the stormwater system. man: this big vactor truck works on the same principle as your vacuum cleaner in your house, only this thing sucks up the whole house. some of the storm drains collect a lot of trash. i started cleaning drains in '93. they were horrible because they hadn't been maintained so much. now this is a priority. you have trash, animal waste, and it ends up on our beaches. that is a health risk. that is one of the main reasons why we have to close the beaches after heavy rain. narrator: but even when it's not raining, water still enters the stormwater system, carrying pollutants. here on the west coast, a lot of our storm drain systems are separate from the sanitary sewer system, so if you dump something in the storm drain, it goes right to the ocean untreated. alamillo: we haven't had a major rainstorm in the last year or so yet there's a lot of water in this creek here. i would say 20% of it is natural and the other 80% is runoff. shapiro:
of boston has taken back that area. the first thing they will do is have environment am hazmat groups make a final sweep there, make sure there isn't any residue from the explosives. the other thing they will do is quite fascinating, they have to make sure the structural integrity of the buildings surrounding the bomb site has held up. the top of the bomb ended up on top of the lennox hotel. that's what shows you the striking power of what those two terrorists were able to create. so they want to make sure those buildings are okay. after that, they'll have a process for folks who left property there can come back and pick it up, get it. they're really trying for the folks to get that area back at least some semblance of normalcy in the next few weeks because a lot of folks could like to open their businesses back up again and the community built for a few days, i'm guessing we like to go back there and take back boylston street. it will be fascinating thing to see. >> memorial, the weeks an months ahead will be a great thing, too, for the lives lost. thanks, luke, have a great day. >> repo
that only becomes more true in these environments. think about, this isn't islamabad coming online. think about what that does for education, for health. think about 5 billion new witnesses that can document atrocities that are being committed. of course there are challenges but there is a lot of good news ahead of us. >> everybody's empowered. you do a google search when you go to a doctor and instead of sitting there where the doctor is playing god -- >> has all the info -- >> you have as much info as you want going in there and a lot of doctors hate that. you can say wait a second, isn't there a possibility if you do that, this is -- we are empowered in every way from powered by a car and how we're taken care of and also democratically. i had had a political science professor who told me back in the '80s the soviets were mar for worried about a xerox machine than a cruise missile in west germany and she was right. >> the empowerment of information of people is really the way to solve almost every problem. when we went to north korea our idea was that if we could just get a little bit o
the environment of the blast, these are things that were packed into the bomb. >> i think we are still getting details of all the events that happened, and obviously it's very difficult to conclude, based on initial impressions. i won't exclude completely the possibility that some of the fragments are environmental, but my opinion is that most of them were in the bombs. >> reporter: most of the injuries were to the lower portions of the body. a possible indication of a more sophisticated, directed blast. now of the 31 people who were brought here 12 still remain. six to eight are under anesthesia at this moment. there were four amputations performed here and the doctors say for the most part these were automatic amputations, that the limbs had endured so much trauma the way one doctor described it, they just finished what the bomb had done, jon. jon: so for those who are still hospitalized how is it looking? >> reporter: the doctors won't make any promises, but they said it's looking pretty good. there are some limbs that are still at risk of amputation. also you had patients out here with a l
no, but the good thing is that we're actually in an urban environment and there's a lot of buildings around and other materials that will stop some of this evidence as it crawls across the pavement and it will be found. the agents will go in and start conducting a crime scene investigation to find even the most minute pieces of evidence and what we call bag and tag and send to the laboratory. in the laboratory, the forensic scientists, examiners, will look at these pieces of debris and then start making conclusions as to what the device consisted of. >> how do you-- i understand how you could piece together what was the bomb made of. how did it work, how was it detonated and so on. but how-- we're told in the pan am 103 bombing which you helped investigate, that it was a thumbnail sized piece of evidence that led to the identity of the bomber. i mean, how can that be? how can you get to the identity from the remnants of the bomber? >> well, sometimes in pan am 103, the fragment of the circuit board that was the timer that detonated the device, is so generically-- well, not genericall
anything else becoming empowered to look into your environment and what we're seeing from boston, heroes is comi
are a vulnerable group. >> generally speaking you need the environment in which they were flourish and which they can work together. you need the context. >> rose: if they are good -- >> it will happen with the actor speaking the text and somebody listening. you don't need the director for that you need somebody to organize it all. >> rose: how much do you want to act? >> you know, i always juggled both. and i read -- as i joined strad for as an actor i read a piece of fla ubert that said most people in life end up what they do second best. >> rose: by dereking you are doing what you do second best? >> no first best. >> rose: as a actor you were seco best? >> other people could my the parts i was playing. i suppose i could see. i like to stand back and see the whole -- >> rose: it's an interesting idea because you think about shaping other things. the idea is how do you make a decision as to what it is you do best, not second best? and how do you drill down on that so you are truly being creative and bringing something that no one else has? i'm sure people are smart at self evaluation and th
? >> the average person? >> yes, absolutely. you can. >> what? >> when you go into an environment like this, first, you want to say am i indoors, outdoor, this is an outdoor event. where am i standing? are there trash cans near me? is there a mailbox near me? that can be a someplace where somebody can conceal a device. don't stand there. is there glass around me? get away from that, stand near a structure that's concrete, steel, brick. even if the blast is from a distance, the blast wave can shatter all that glass and severely injure or possible kill. >> do you need to be thinking about that? >> it's such a weird thing to think about. >> on a day when you're celebrating, you're not thinking about this. >> you should think about this all the time. wherever you go. whether it's a movie theater, the school, the mall. >> is it our new reality? and is it going to get worse? >> i think this is reality and i think that you should do this, it takes a few minutes, any place you go, what do i do if this happens. >> what do you think it does to your psyche? there are some people, i get it, you live your life
whether these were small bits of metal placed there intentionally or part of the environment. >> reporter: shrapnel is just one of the clues investigators will be looking at. >> there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments within the victims. fragments in the sidewalk. what they're going to be able to do is probably reconstruct the timer device, what was used, they're going to look at the components of the bomb, able to tell them is this just somebody that put this together over the internet or is this a bomb maker? >> reporter: hundreds of state and federal investigators have descended on boston to try to find out who could have built the bombs and set them off. >> there are federal, state and local law enforcement all on scene and coordinating very close ly. the fbi has taken charge of the investigation. >> reporter: this type of attack has long been law enforcement's worst fear, a soft target where suspects can easily blend in and inflict mass casualties. the boston marathon is a heavily policed event. more than 500 national guard troops were on s
of that traffic. .t causes obviously delays it has an adverse impact on the environment as well. is to expand the american plaza, but also pursue span.bridges fan -- new yorket in buffalo, we southern ontario are -- need capacity. w want emphasize that we are trying to remove barriers to access, both physical and in tolls. when you look at the situation with the peace bridge, a lot of tolls are being used to support expansion of the plaza to promote traffic between the united states and canada. this is something that would be of concern. my sense is that it would be a new agency imposed toll compared to the ones that are already in place. help iniate all of your helping us address the issues and the peace bridge connecting buffalo and southern ontario in particular. i yield that. >> thank you. i turned to the gentleman from utah. thank youecretary, for your services. this is probably a long hearing. you do not know the line of questioning, so it requires you to be an expert on everything. things i would like to ask you quickly if i could. >> sure. >> as a former air force pilot, uncomfortabl
with our reduced output so the faith is still there, that it's well run in a bad macro economic environment which comes back to mcdonald's which you have a note out today from sus can dehanna which says it is executing across the world and it is stable in its market share or gaining and it is against it. that seems to be the major theme. >> another theme that's sort of emerged in these big companies, citigroup, as well is the strength of the latin american consumer and the latin american corporation. caterpillar noting that lshg, even though china continues to be weak and there seems to be a shift from asia pacific to latin america coming from these multinationals. >> resuming the buyback does not hurt by the end of the year. it had approved for a while in '07. >> and that might be taking some of the sting out of this today. >> when we come back, yet another price target cut for apple ahead of its earnings and this time from bmo. colin gilles over at bgc is upgrading the stock this morning. which one is right? we'll hear from both analysts this morning. the dow coming off its worst week sin
. how do you see the regulatory environment playing out? and how are you going to improve margins in this scenario? >> actually, my margins improved by 140 basis points over the quarter. so we had a record margin for the first quarter. so over a 40% margin. i was asked specifically, can our margins even improve more, and i said, well, we have a lot of pressures on regulatory issues. we're reinvesting in our company by hiring more people. so i was just being cautionary. but to answer your question, our margins have had improved year after year. they're going to improve from 2012 into 2013. i believe our business model will allow margins to improve, despite, despite, we're spending at more money on lawyers, spending a lot more time working with our regulators. and i think this is just the cost of doing business moving forward. >> we'll leave it there. larry, always wonderful to have you on the program. thanks so much for your time. >> thanks, maria. >> larry fink, black rock. we have a market up 112 points. we are still waiting on answers coming out of boston in terms of suspects. w
and also some worries about the global growth environment. we think we may have a little bit of a pause here, but we're going to see continued growth through the year. it will be rewarded by take risk in the stock market. >> why? >> because with growth keeping up and inflation being under control, monetary policy is going to stay very easy, and we see that as being something that's going to lead to equity returns being positive. >> you have to admit, we've had a very good first quarter, 10% gains for most of the averages, 15% at the most extreme. aren't we due for a correction of some kind? >> well, we could absolutely have a pause here and a small correction wouldn't be off the realm, but without a big downturn in data or a big change in monetary policy expectations, i think it will be relative tame. >> what have you thought of the earnings so far this season? >> they've been modestly disappointing. we got some news today about corporate business jet appetite that was a little bit disappointing. but then look at the fed beige book report today, where they saw their seeing slightly impr
yan. tla there's been tough military action. you flee that environment. you come into the united states. you go to school. you get a scholarship. you have friends. but somewhere in that leadened, deadened heart, head of yours, it's still not good enough. there is a cause that's more important, not survival, and i'm not sure we'll ever be able to comprehend that. we need to try because it may give us potential to identify other people. here we have a rather remarkable journey these two young men took. a journey literally millions have taken. and they've contributed to the united states. their contribution was death and destruction. of innocent people. we may never understand, rationalize, how. >> as you reference the uncle who pleaded with his nephew, dzhokhar, give yourself up, give yourself up. and of course that is the fervent wish of law enforcement officials for a number of reasons. one is for the survival of dzhokhar tsarnaev because there is a manhunt for him and he will not escape that network of law enforcement at some point. this will not come to a good end. but also fro
? >> regardless of what we think, we have to pursue that angle. you can't bet on what you think in an environment like this. you've got to understand that if there is a network, we can't pretend that there's not. so when you're looking at these two kids, to me, everything that they did suggests that they're amateurs. where they placed the weapon, the fact that they didn't o obscure themselves when they walked down the street, the primitive nature of the explosives. but we've been focused on these two spiders, most media is not talking about the search for the spider web. did they get training, did they get weapons, did they get travel? >> neither of these suspects are on a watch list or were on a watch list. the older brother goes to russia, comes back, starts posting videos online about islam, about terrorism. did we miss this? was there something where we should have actually been able to know? >> posting videos is a free speech issue, and if were still in the fbi, we would be very cautious about looking at something like that. because you're allowed to be a radical in this country. this countr
to bring a little kin to the environment. here's some of what you said. r.d. copeland tweeted us, i build raw bale and ear plasr homes. can you explain what that means? >> he's got two brothers. >> i was thinking the same thing. >> we applaud him for what he's doing. >> i bet it smells goodtoo. >> another one. lindsay says her forite way to save the planet,sing cloth apers an wipes. >> i heard about that when i had my daughter. >> and then what happened? >> i think i tried it for, like, two days. >> you have to watch them. i thought the smell, and the sink is full of you know what. >> why do you hate the environment? >> willie! >> giada knows being green is a ar round deal. she's been working with ks in an elementary school in l.a. to plant a gardennd grow their own food. >> that's terrific. >> how did this come about? >> what i did in partnership with my agency is that we adopted the school i compton, californ. it's foster elementa, and there's a lot of actual kids who are foster kids in the school. what i really wanted to do tru was just allow them to have a pleasant, fun, educational e
held for 30 days an interrogated in the same environment where he is now. obviously, there would be no enhanced interrogation techniques. there would be an effort by skilled investigators to bond with him over a period of time, at the end of that period, he could have formally been arrested, charged, what what happened today could have happened 30 days from now. this is what the obama administration wants. they don't care about the intelligence. they made it very clear they want people to have lawyers, to have trials and if we lose intelligence in the process, they say that's regrettable but that's just the way it is. that is unacceptable to me. it should be unacceptable to anybody who cares about preventing future terrorist attacks. >> mitch epnor it has my back up. who cares about my back. all i'm saying it sounds like this is the criminal justice model not a terrorist bombing warfare model. that's something that if administration has been accused of. did they make a mistake here? >> well, i'm going to agree it is a criminal justice model and not a terrorist enemy combatant mod
a weaker or softish commodity environment will drive that even further and higher. >> when i see you, the one commodity which is oil, give me your take here and correct me if i'm wrong, but you've always been a big bull. >> yeah. reality is oil. we just don't have a lot of new sources for it and you really have to take the world and slam it to almost zero growth before that would really undermine the supply/demand picture for oil. oil production grows about a million, a million and a half barrels a year and demand grows about that amount and the cost structure to bring that on is now $80 to $90 a barrel and i can't say this doomsday scenario that people say the oil markets will be prone to, and if it fits in the broader picture that the global economy is doing fine, you will see oil bottoming here in the next $5, $6 a barrel and probably making close to a new high by the end of the year. so everybody understands why that's a positive, but there are some who want to read both the decline in crude and gold as, all right, we're not going to have inflation and we're also not going to hav
words of calm. a day later, how is this sinking in? >> well, i think obviously the city, the environment around the city is still in a state of shock. the city will not be business as usual today. many of the streets around us you can see have been closed off, back bay, the entire area of the finish line is closed off and shut down. but like any city like new york, after september 11th, like any city in this country, people are resilient, we'll go on. >> yesterday was a special day for people outside of boston, can you explain? >> oh, joe. >> you know, the sox play, it's a holiday in boston, actually. >> it's a holiday. >> the sox play in the afternoon. you were there with your son. >> it's a traditional holiday. it's perhaps the greatest day for the city during the course of the year. it's a day when the entire city wears a smile. it's a day when hundreds of thousands of people arrive here from literally around the globe and certainly around the nation to run, first, in the boston marathon, 26 miles in massachusetts, to the boylston finish line. the game concludes just as the middle of
that will come with this legislation. retailers have been operating in an environment where they have not been required to collect and remitt sales taxes for states where they do not have a physical presence. this legislation would change that almost in an instant. before we enact a new sales tax system we need to take into accounts the costs that will impose on businesses of all sizes and the difficulties those -- these companies will face as they adapt to the new regime. for example, there is the issue of vendor compensation. the streamlined sales and use tax agreement currently includes a provision giving states the opportunity to voluntarily compensate remote sellers -- quote -- "as a measure of good faith"-- unquote for registering to voluntarily collect and remit sales taxes into states where the seller has no physical presence. this is included in the agreement because under current law remote sellers are generally not required to collect and remit the sales tax and they incur a cost when doing so. the marketplace fairness act does not include any provision for compensation of remote se
had -- they may not have had ieds but certainly have had high stress environments that kind of mimic a conflict. i'm thinking here about parts of the inner city or what is known as the inner city, cities like -- places like compton detroit, chicago a couple of years has been off the charts, parts of d.c. back in the '80s, parts of new york. so i mean -- i think there are high stress environments that mimic conflict zones. however, again i think this was different because this was -- we ignore what happens within our inner cities, within our urban centers and then in a way we ignore what happens in other people's cities and other people's foreign centers where we are active. and i think this was one moment that was broadcast all over -- all across the nation. it was all across the world. people were watching. all of a sudden, middle class americans, people who live in places like watertown they get a taste of what other countries -- what other people, what other parts of their own country have to go through. i don't think that it's crazy to -- the vocabulary that was used was the same
environment to stay steady in yourself. if this young boy looked up to his brother, his brother was radicalized into a cult. he is empty to begin with. he is the vessel that could potentially be recruited into a religion that had veered into cult status. >> megyn: the older brother is seven years old. significant, and the parents had divorced. mother had returned to more radical form of islam and recruited tamerian with that. the father had been an attorney and worked as mechanic because he couldn't find the kind of work he wanted. yet the uncle of these two boys, he had troubles but he loved america and he loved it as the land of opportunity. it seems like these boys went very different way. got to run. up next former attorney general under president bush says there is enough evidence to call these bombings a case of jihad. critics are already slamming him. stay tuned. r family the very best in taste, freshness, and nutrition? it's eb. want to give them more vitamins, omega 3s, and less saturated fat? it's eb. eggland's best eggs. eb's. the only eggs that make better taste and
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